Review – A Matter of Days – Introduction

Dr. Ross begins his book by explaining part of the reason for his book:

Debates over the age of the universe and earth and the length of the Genesis creation days have-for the past several decades-deeply divided the evangelical Christian community…This impediment to Christian unity appears to be heightening into a storm of ferocious fury.

He is correct here. He is attempting in his book to provide a rebuttal to those who hold a young earth position, so that the “unity” for which he longs is really the eradication of the ideas of the other side. There is significant division on this point, but he seems not to understand the totality of the division when he writes,

What could generate such tension and divisiveness? One simple word: ‘day’.

While the word day is the catalyst for such division, the totality of the argument is better understood to be ‘biblical interpretation.’ What things can be used to interpret the Bible? How much does context matter when interpreting words? Where there appear to be tensions between the Bible and interpretations of observations, which side of the tug-of-war maintains authority in interpreting the other.
I’ll come back to this point repeatedly since throughout the book Dr. Ross echos that modern interpretations of observations that he calls ‘nature’s record’ and ‘scientific facts’ are authoritative over scripture. Being familiar with his arguments, he calls nature the 67th book of scripture or the “book of nature”. He cites passages like Romans 1:20, which says “For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities-his eternal power and divine nature-have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse” as confirmation of the book of nature. While I do believe every word of the text, Ross’s interpretation of the passage is that instead of the revelation of God in creation being sufficient for a person’s judgment, that modern paradigms that interpret creation can be used to re-interpret special revelation. However, Genesis 3:17 (God-”Cursed is the ground”), Romans 8:20-21 (“For the creation was subjected to frustration…hope that creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to corruption”) and nature CANNOT have the same authority as God’s special revelation in the Bible.
Proper biblical hermeneutics maintains that only scripture can interpret scripture. When there appears to be tension between the Bible and some competing jurisdiction (scientific paradigm, cultural, political, historical…), SCRIPTURE must be the authority. Competing ‘authorities’ must be submissive to God’s eternal revelation. Throughout the book, Dr. Ross tries to build the case that interpretations of fallen creation can interpret God’s eternal Word.

hermeneutics
Dr. Ross (and other old earthers) takes liberty with the Hebrew word for ‘day’ (yom), which he is able to stretch the meaning from 12 hours to billions of years. With a range that large, where day can essentially mean ANYTHING, does it have meaning at all? Using the same ranges would it be fair to use the word ‘puddle’ for both a body of water that is
8,000,000,000 feet deep and 8,000,000,000 feet in diameter
AND
2 inches deep and 2 inches in diameter?

As the word puddle would lose all meaning if it could describe everything from a splash to a body of water twice the size of the sun, so the word ‘day’ loses all meaning if abnormally forced to include both “all time” and 24 hours.
Having said this, biblical creationists do recognize the Hebrew word (yom) has some flexibility. Like its English counterpart, yom can be daylight hours, 24 hours, or a season of time. But nowhere in scripture does yom have the pliability to accommodate billions of years as Ross suggests. To get this definition, he is forced to bring his outside assumptions into the scriptural text. This process is called eisegesis, and when interpreting the Biblical text, eisegesis is a NO-NO.

UPDATE: Here’s what scientist and apologist Dr. Jason Lisle has to say about the Hebrew word for “day” (yom)

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12 thoughts on “Review – A Matter of Days – Introduction

  1. Pingback: Book Review: A Matter of Days 2nd Edition by Hugh Ross | ApoloJedi

  2. There was a time when I sided with Ross, but as I did more research and developed a better understanding of Scripture, I now find his interpretations lacking.

    Based on his interpretation of ‘day’, how many years was Jesus in the tomb, or how long was Jonah in the belly of a fish? Millions of years???

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Review – A Matter of Days – Chapter 3 | ApoloJedi

  4. Pingback: Review – A Matter of Days – Chapter 6 | ApoloJedi

  5. Pingback: Review – A Matter of Days – Chapter 7 (part 1) | ApoloJedi

  6. Pingback: Review – A Matter of Days – Chapter 17 | ApoloJedi

  7. Pingback: Review – A Matter of Days – Chapter 18 | ApoloJedi

  8. Reblogged this on sixdaysblog and commented:
    My previous two posts concentrated on a video presentation by Dr. Denis Lamoreaux where he discusses his book on theistic evolution, called Evolutionary Creation: A Christian Approach to Evolution. I’m critical of his conclusions because he has reinterpreted the Bible, and justifies it by his adherence to an approach he refers to as Biblical accommodation.

    In this post, I’m reblogging a similar review of Dr. Hugh Ross’s book, A Matter of Days by my fellow blogger, ApoloJedi. While he provides an excellent critique on all twenty chapters, I’m posting his review of Chapter 1, and I hope you enjoy his take on Dr. Ross’s version of old earth creation.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Pingback: Review – A Matter of Days – Chapter 22 | ApoloJedi

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